Morly Grey: Krauty in Ohio

Morly Grey: Krauty in Ohio

There’s a wealth of unknown music floating around out there with its players engaged in lame workaday nonsense. Every once in a while, a disc gets dug up and allows the folks who performed on it to radically change their lives. Good story, right? Well, that’s not what happened to the Morly Grey. But the band’s still pretty decent for a group that wasn’t able to amass a significant following during its heyday.

When was that heyday, you might wonder. Well, back during the tail end of the sixties when everyone realized all you needed to do to get hippie chicks was to affect some political nonsense and play rock music, a group of hicks in the wilds of Ohio went and worked up a pretty diverse range of music. Releasing it as The Only Truth, but releasing it to something like five people, didn’t do much for the band’s career. That being said, a second disc followed a few years later, but only served as a reminder as to why no one picked up on Morly Grey in the first place.

Anyway, that first album include a bunch of compositions sitting right between indulgent sixties psych and what would eventually be termed progressive rock. Tracks like “I’m Afraid” took a bit of Canned Heat’s boogie flavor and smoothed out the rugged blues influence, inserting a bit of a traditional rock hock. By all rights, one of these tracks should have hooked a substantial audience, but it didn’t. The obvious answer as to why Morly Grey wasn’t a huge hit has to do with the market place and the fact that so many acts dating to the period were a hapdash pastiche of whatever people thought went into making a gold gilded rock ensemble. Separating these Ohioans from the chaff, though, is the concluding track on The Only Truth.

Easily the longest effort at seventeen minutes, the album’s title track begins in a manner not too different than the rest of what’s been included. What’s interesting, though, is that after all the hard rock stuff’s been exhausted, a lengthy guitar section – and I don’t mean solo, I mean, just guitar – takes over the composition. The looped guitar, all echoey and delayed, is obviously a studio creation, and perhaps impossible to reproduce in a live setting. But it still counts as one of the few Stateside efforts approaching what krauts were doing. And doing better than Americans.